Monthly Archives: May 2018

Selling your property? There might be some costs you are not aware of

If you are selling property in South Africa, check what costs you have to pay, and if they’re applicable to you.

  1. Bond costs

Cancellation Costs: This is charged when you cancel your bond after selling your property. They total up to R3 000 or more.

Early Settlement Penalty: If your home was recently purchased and you are in the early years (approximately 3 years) of bond repayments, your bank is entitled to charge you an early settlement fee for consolidating your bond sooner than expected. Inquire this fee with your bank so that you are set for payment.

Notice Period Penalty: With so many other things to be concerned about, you are likely unaware of the need to notify the bank of your intent to sell. While this may vary with different banks, most of them require a written notice 90 days in advance before you start consolidating your bond. Failing to supply this notice on time will entitle your bank to charge you with penalty interest.

The transfer process: This process, from the date you accept a desirable offer to purchase to the registration of the home to the buyer’s name, can take anywhere between 2.5 and 3 months. In the case where you could need money from your bond to pay off any other financial obligations, then you should withdraw it before giving your notice of cancellation.

  1. Agent’s commission and VAT

Estate agents have insight on property market trends, which is beneficial to ensure you receive what you deserve for your home. They do, however, charge commission on the sale of any property, and it is usually expressed as a percentage of the purchase price, however, it excludes VAT. This is likely the biggest cost of selling, so selling privately is an option available to you.

  1. Compliance certificates

Compliance certificates ensure that any installations that could be deemed dangerous in your home are done by a professional and done correctly. As a seller, it is your responsibility to ensure they are up to date before supplying them to the buyer. These certificates cost at least R500 each, but if there are faults discovered upon inspection, then you also have to pay for the necessary work to be done before the certificate can be issued.

Electrical: The Electrical Certificate of Compliance, also referred to as an ECOC, is valid for two years from the date of issue.

Electrical Fence System Compliance Certificate: Different from an ECOC, the Electrical Fence System Compliance Certificate is required for a home with electrical fencing as a security measure.

Beetle (entomological): While not compulsory, if the home you are selling is in the Western Cape or KwaZulu-Natal regions, you will generally need to provide the purchaser with certification. This certificate indicates that the property is free from beetle infestations.

Gas: To confirm that the gas lines in the home are safe, homeowners will be required to obtain a certificate of conformity, which indicates that the installation has been done by a qualified technician.

Plumbing: Currently a requirement for Cape Town, this certificate confirms that the plumbing on the property is sound. This certificate does not confirm that the property is free from rising damp or that there are no blocked drains.

  • If the inspection results in work needing to be done to achieve compliance, then the contractor will give a quote for it.
  1. Rates, taxes and levies clearance certificate

Rates and taxes: Attorneys will require a rates and taxes clearance certificate from the local council, and the seller will need to put money upfront to get this certificate. To provide the clearance certificate, the council can ask between 2 and 6 months of future-dated payments.

  • If the home happens to be registered within a shorter time frame, the council will pay back the additional money which the seller has paid.

Levies: In the instance where the seller is in an estate or sectional title property, the homeowners’ association or body corporate may request that the seller pays for their levies a few months in advance to ensure such costs are covered until transfer takes place.

  1. Property Capital Gains Tax

This tax is not charged on all property, but if charged, it is taxable on the resale of property. This cost is the responsibility of the seller.

  1. Moving costs

This is an inevitable part of moving from the sold property, and it is often not considered until the last minute. What must be considered here is how the move from point A to B will be made and this can also vary depending on how many trips need to be made. The costs to consider are the petrol costs and the possible cost of professional movers.

  • Getting insurance for items being moved should be factored in.

Paying to Sell Infograph

Please contact us should you have any specific questions.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Sectional titles: What is the role of the body corporate?

B1When it comes to sectional title schemes, there is still widespread misunderstanding of even the basics, starting with the body corporate and how it is established, as well as what its functions and powers are. This misunderstanding often gives rise to many problems and disputes in sectional title schemes which could quite easily have been avoided.

What is a sectional title?

A Sectional Title Development Scheme, usually referred to as a “scheme”, provides for separate ownership of a property, by individuals. These schemes fall under the control of the Sectional Titles Act, which came into effect on 1 June 1988.

When you buy a property that’s part of a scheme, you own the inside of the property i.e. the space contained by the inner walls, ceilings & floors of the unit. You are entitled to paint or decorate or undertake alterations as desired, providing such alterations do not infringe on municipal by-laws.

What is the body corporate?

The Body Corporate is the collective name given to all the owners of units in a scheme. Units usually refers to the townhouses or flats in a development. The body corporate comes into existence as soon as the developer of the scheme transfers a unit to a new owner. This means that all registered owners of units in a scheme are members of the Body Corporate.

  1. The Body Corporate controls and runs the Scheme.
  2. Day-to-day administration of the Scheme is vested in trustees who are appointed by the Body Corporate.
  3. Major decisions regarding the Scheme are made by the Body Corporate, usually at the annual general meeting (AGM), or at a special general meeting (SGM). At these meetings, matters, which affect the Scheme, are discussed, budgets are approved, rules can be changed and trustees are appointed. Each member of a Body Corporate is entitled to vote at these meetings, providing that the member is not in arrears with levy payments or in serious breach of the rules.

The Body Corporate exists to manage and administer the land and buildings in the scheme. This means, that the Body Corporate is required to enforce the legislation and rules in the Sectional Titles Act, the Management Rules and the Conduct Rules of the scheme. Amongst their other duties, the Trustees manage the Body Corporate’s funds, enforce the rules and resolve conflict to the best of their ability.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Am I still liable for my spouse’s debt after divorce?

B2A husband and wife buy a house together. Their marriage takes a tumble, along with their ­finances, and they have to sell their home and are left with an outstanding mortgage bond. They subsequently got divorced. The couple is concerned about what will happen to the debts and who will be ­responsible for paying them.

Who pays what after divorce?

If the couple was married in ­community of property, the debt on the property is a joint debt. They will be jointly and severally liable. This means that each partner is not just liable for half the debt now that they are divorced, in fact the bank can seek the full amount from either of them. The one spouse who is held liable by the bank would then have a claim of 50% of the debt against the other, but it would be his or her responsibility to collect that debt (not the bank’s). Alternatively, the bank may agree to accept 50% from one person and release them from the ­liability, but it does not have to.

Sometimes, the divorce settlement makes a special mention of the mortgage. But if there is no clause in the divorce, the joint liability principle applies. After a divorce, the husband and wife should present their bank with a copy of the divorce settlement. This will remove any uncertainty about ownership and liability for bond payments.

Getting divorced while under debt review

If you get divorced while you are under debt review and you have the debt review court order in place, then this will need to be rescinded and for new debt counselling applications to be started, as in order to follow on with the debt counselling process you will need to reapply, but will now need to be seen as two single applications. A new budget and new proposals will also have to be drawn up.

References:

  • “Debt And Divorce”. News24. N.p., 2017. Web. 12 June 2017.
  • “Debt Review After A Divorce Settlement – Debt Review”. Debtbusters. N.p., 2017. Web. 13 June 2017.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)